An opinion on multimodality practice in literacy

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An opinion on multimodality practice in literacy

Centre for Instructional Psychology and Technology, K. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution Licensewhich permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract An interactive whiteboard IWB is a relatively new tool that provides interesting affordances in the classroom environment, such as multiple visualization and multimedia presentation and ability for movement and animation.

An opinion on multimodality practice in literacy

These affordances make IWBs an innovative tool with high potential for mathematics instructional environments. IWBs can be used to focus on the development of specific mathematical concepts and to improve mathematical knowledge and understanding.

The aim of this paper is to review the existing literature upon the use of interactive whiteboards IWBs in mathematics classrooms. The capabilities of IWBs to enhance the quality of interaction, and, consequently, to improve conceptual mathematical understanding are broadly recognized.

Despite these capabilities, evidence from the studies points to a certain inertia on the part of many teachers to do anything else than use IWBs as large-scale visual blackboards or presentation tools. The emerging view of how to attempt to overcome these obstacles is that there is need for greater attention to the pedagogy associated with IWB use and, more specifically, to stimulate the design of new kinds of learning environments.

Introduction In recent years, interactive whiteboards IWBs have moved from being considered a novelty into a regular part of the equipment of many classrooms, especially in the United Kingdom, and in other countries of Western Europe, North and Central America, South East Asia, and Australia.

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IWBs provide interesting opportunities for students and teachers alike to interact with digital content in a multiperson learning environment. This study aims to deliver a critical analysis of the literature on IWBs in mathematics teaching, with a view to An opinion on multimodality practice in literacy strong and weak points and specifying a theoretically and practically relevant research agenda.

The review first shortly discusses IWB affordances and presents the focus of the study as well as the adopted methodological approach.

Abstract. An interactive whiteboard (IWB) is a relatively new tool that provides interesting affordances in the classroom environment, such as multiple visualization and multimedia presentation and ability for movement and animation. Peter Kent is the Deputy Principal at Richardson Primary in the ACT. This article describes that school's recent experience with "Smart Boards" - an interactive computer display which allows the teacher to work through and navigate various software and the Internet from the same position as the traditional blackboard. Article PDF. Introduction. The early s marked the first publications both in English studies and communication studies to address lesbian and gay issues.

Finally, some conclusive observations and reflections are developed, also in relation to the general literature about information and communication technology ICT. Technologically speaking, IWBs connect a computer—linked to a data projector—and a large touch-sensitive board that displays the image projected from the computer and allows direct input and manipulation through the use of fingers or styli.

Software provided with the boards offers additional functions that improve the facility to control the computer at the touch of the screen [ 1 ]. As Beauchamp and Parkinson [ 2 ], Kennewell [ 3 ], Mercer et al.

These features, combined with a display large enough for a whole class to see clearly, provide teachers with opportunities for access to a rich blend of diverse, multimodal resources, for manipulation and exploration and for increasing class participation.

As a result, IWBs are claimed: IWBs have been found to be particularly useful in teaching mathematics. The large-scale study by Somekh et al.

Mathematics has always been, and is still, a subject of considerable importance in schools; it is also a subject in which educational technologies are frequently employed, in part because the teaching of mathematic topics may greatly benefit from multiple representations and animations, and in part because a great deal of software for mathematics instruction is available [ 8 ].

An opinion on multimodality practice in literacy

As reported by different authors, in the UK, USA, Canada, Australia, and other countries, IWBs are increasingly being used in mathematics instruction both in primary and secondary education [ 9 — 12 ].

Often mathematics lessons show a lack of variety, with typical lessons concentrating on the acquisition of skills, the solution of routine exercises and preparation for tests and examinations [ 14 ].

In mathematics education, it is commonly claimed that the use of multiple representations and the flexibility to switch between them is an important component in mathematical thinking, learning, and problem solving. Given its previously described affordances, IWB technology provides an innovative tool with high potential for mathematics instructional environments.

Teachers can use IWBs for modelling mathematical ideas and strategies, demonstrating theorems, explaining difficult concepts, stimulating discussion about relevant mathematical topics, inviting interpretations of what is displayed, and challenging students to apply their mathematics to solve problems [ 16 ].

Good practice in mathematics education includes the use of high quality diagrams and relevant software to support learning through, for example, construction of graphs or visualisation of transformations [ 1017 ]. Furthermore, mathematics learning is an essentially constructive activity.

Learners need to engage in the processes of mathematical thinking: Because mathematics education is one of the domains in which IWB technology may be most beneficial and because, consequently, it is one of the domains that has received most attention in IWB research, our literature review focuses on studies of mathematics teaching through IWBs.

Method The review process followed the three main steps of a systematic literature review [ 20 ], namely, retrieval, selection, and analysis of the literature. Research was identified through authoritative internet sources: The research sought for journal articles, book chapters, proceedings, and doctoral dissertations concerning teaching and learning mathematics in IWB environments.

Publications about specific didactical practice for instance a paper by Merrett and Edwards [ 21 ] concerning software applications for angles study or papers pointing at special groups of students for instance disabled or gifted students were excluded from the review.

The literature search was conducted in English searches conducted in Italian and French did not identify any relevant resultsbecause the literature on IWBs is mostly in English as educational institutions in the UK and the USA were first to adopt this technology and stems predominantly from research in UK, where IWBs have been used in classroom environments since In more recent years, IWB use has spread through other countries, such as Australia and some European countries, and a number of studies from these countries are also available and have been considered in this review.

Some special journal issues Learning, Media and Technology, 32, 3; Technology, Pedagogy and Education, 19, 1; Australasian Journal of Educational Technology, 26, 4 and an edited volume by Thomas and Schmid [ 22 ] published in recent years, and providing evidence of the great interest generated by this tool, were also consulted and selected.

The search for internet sources and journal annals was limited to publications from the last twelve years i. Studies were analysed with respect to methodological approaches, key findings, implications, and conclusions of each study. The studies were categorized as follows: Table 1 shows the reviewed articles, the education level, the country, type, employed methods, and whether the article was peer-reviewed.

Key studies included in the review in alphabetical order of first author. Large-Scale Studies Three large-scale studies were retrieved, two in primary education [ 718 ] and one in secondary education [ 17 ].

In this project, IWBs were installed in all of the Year 5 and 6 classes in more than 70 primary schools classes in six regions of England [ 1824 ].About us. John Benjamins Publishing Company is an independent, family-owned academic publisher headquartered in Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

More. Peter Kent is the Deputy Principal at Richardson Primary in the ACT. This article describes that school's recent experience with "Smart Boards" - an interactive computer display which allows the teacher to work through and navigate various software and the Internet from the same position as the traditional blackboard.

The Oncologist is a journal devoted to medical and practice issues for surgical, radiation, and medical oncologists. Abstract. An interactive whiteboard (IWB) is a relatively new tool that provides interesting affordances in the classroom environment, such as multiple visualization and multimedia presentation and ability for movement and animation.

Peter Kent is the Deputy Principal at Richardson Primary in the ACT. This article describes that school's recent experience with "Smart Boards" - an interactive computer display which allows the teacher to work through and navigate various software and the Internet from .

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Abstract. An interactive whiteboard (IWB) is a relatively new tool that provides interesting affordances in the classroom environment, such as multiple visualization and multimedia presentation and ability for movement and animation.

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