Essay on socrates euthyphro

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Essay on socrates euthyphro

Ethics In this paper I will describe and analyze the Euthyphro dialogue where Plato offered an argument against the divine command Meta- ethical view. In this dialogue, Socrates argued against Euthyphro definition of actions being pious and holy.

Socrates presents this premise to argue against Euthyphro definition of piety as he suggests this question. What Socrates has asked is whether something is lovable because the God s love it, or the God s love it for the reason that something is loveable.

He points out this question because it introduces the Euthyphro dilemma. This dilemma obstructs Socrates to draw the conclusion of what pious and holiness is. Socrates suggests that there are two horns in the Euthyphro dilemma.

The first horn that he illustrates is the question of whether moral is loved by the God s because it is moral. Socrates points out that if an action is holy then the God s will love it. And no matter how the God s feels about it, or whether if the God s will approve or disprove it, and that action will still be holy.

For instance, we all know that rape is impious. No matter how the God s think, he cannot change the fact that rape is impious. Following the first horn in the Euthyphro dilemma, Socrates introduces the second horn in the dilemma. As he again asks: Or is it holy because it is loved?

This second horn is also known as the Divine Command Theory. In this theory it claims that the God s is goodness.

In order for us to judge whether an action is moral or immoral is solely based on whether the God s allows us to do it, or prohibits us from doing it. In contrast, the second horn is rather the opposite of the first horn. Here are the analyses of how successful the two horns are in the Dilemma.

Suppose the first horn: And therefore piety is not affected or determined by the God s. In other words, no matter whether the God s loves an action or not, piety still exists on the action.

On the other hand, let us assume that the second horn that Socrates presented: Then in this point of view, nothing is good until the God s loves it. Suppose then, that the second horn: However, if this is true, then it raises three problems.

The first problem is known as the problem of arbitrariness.

Essay on socrates euthyphro

It comes to this first problem when the God s chooses which action to love and to hate. And what the God s loves or approves of is based on some property of an action. As a result, in order for the God s to really make an action pious, the God s will have to love and approves the action s arbitrarily, with no reason at all.

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This problem is made worse when if it is true that the omnipotent God can love and approve of anything arbitrarily. For example, if the God s approves and loves assassinations or murders, then the action of assassinating and murder will automatically become pious. And therefore, this problem proves the Devine command theory to be false.

The problem of caprice is the second problem that exists in the second horn from the dilemma. In addition, Socrates explains that if there are many gods, how can things be determined if they are pious or not.

This second problem creates a grey area of whether an action is pious or not.This article introduces Plato's dialogue the Theaetetus (section 1), and briefly summarises its plot (section 2). Two leading interpretations of the dialogue, the Unitarian and Revisionist readings, are contrasted in section 3.

In this paper I will describe and analyze the Euthyphro dialogue where Plato offered an argument against the divine command Meta- ethical view. In this dialogue, Socrates argued against Euthyphro definition of actions being pious and holy.

In Plato’s Euthyphro, Socrates first heard that Euthyphro is trying to prosecute his father for murder. Summary. Socrates encounters Euthyphro outside the court of Athens. Socrates has been called to court on charges of impiety by Meletus, and Euthyphro has come to prosecute his own father for having unintentionally killed a murderous hired hand.

The Euthyphro Dilemma In Plato's dialogue, 'Euthyphro', Socrates presents Euthyphro with a choice: `Is what is pious loved by the gods because it is pious, or is it pious because it is loved [by the gods]?'. Socrates' Defense in the Apology and Search for the Truth about Piety in Euthyphro In Plato's Dialogues, there is the singly ignorant person, the individual who is ignorant of some information or truth but who knows that he is ignorant, and the doubly ignorant person, the individual who is .

BECK index Socrates, Xenophon, and Plato Empedocles Socrates Xenophon's Socrates Defense of Socrates Memoirs of Socrates Symposium Oikonomikos Xenophon.

The Euthyphro Dialogue - Sample Essays